Accession Number : AD0428100

Title :   A STUDY OF THE BIOMEDICAL PROBLEMS RELATED TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF TROOPS AT TERRESTRIAL ALTITUDES OF 10,000 FEET OR ABOVE,

Corporate Author : FEDERATION OF AMERICAN SOCIETIES FOR EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY BETHESDA MD

Personal Author(s) : Griffith,Wendell H. ; Forbes,Allan L.

Report Date : 15 OCT 1963

Pagination or Media Count : 20

Abstract : The biomedical importance of mountain sickness is presented. Exposure to the decreased oxygen tension of high altitudes results in physiological adjustments which are associated with pulmonary hyperventilation. This response of the body aids in maintaining an adequate alveolar concentration of oxygen but it also results in the removal of carbon dioxide at an excessive rate. Consequently, the sequelae of altitude hypoxia include a gamut of imbalances due to changes in concentration of numerous blood and tissue components. The severity of mountain sickness increases with the elevation and varies according to individual differences in the rates of adjustment to the new environment. Although energy requirements for the same physical work are similar in a hypoxic environment and at sea level, the magnitude of the requirement for operational performance is much greater at high elevations because of the effort involved in movements in a mountainous terrain, especially for activity that is necessary despite wind, cold, and cumbersome garments and equipment. Thus, the difficulty in supplying oxygen to tissues is exaggerated. Exertion above 20,000 feet results in deterioration which is difficult to prevent except by recuperation at lower elevations. A supply of oxygen is essential for medical care, especially for the treatment of pulmonary edema. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*MILITARY PERSONNEL, HIGH ALTITUDE), MEDICINE, ACCLIMATIZATION, ENVIRONMENTAL TESTS, OXYGEN, PHYSIOLOGY, RESPIRATION, MOUNTAINS, HYPOXIA, PHYSICAL FITNESS

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE