Accession Number : AD0479162

Title :   PRACTICE AND DRUG EFFECTS IN SERIAL ADDING.

Descriptive Note : Technical rept.,

Corporate Author : MCGILL UNIV MONTREAL (QUEBEC) DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY

Personal Author(s) : Corballis, M. C.

Report Date : FEB 1966

Pagination or Media Count : 20

Abstract : Six male subjects performed a paced serial adding task (PSAT) daily, weekends excepted, for four weeks. Each subject always performed the task at three different pacing rates, with two different stimulus durations at each rate. Every morning, before testing, subjects took capsules which contained either a placebo, or amphetamine, chlorpromazine, meprobamate, or secobarbital. Performance was always better the slower the pacing rate and the longer the stimulus duration, regardless of how practised the subjects were or what drug was administered. There was some evidence from individual records that overall performance was improved by amphetamine and impaired by the other drugs. A hypothesis is advanced to explain why the stimulus duration effect only occurs when pacing is variable, and why it persists despite intensive practice. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*DRUGS, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN)), TRAINING, AMPHETAMINES, CHLORPROMAZINE, TRANQUILIZERS, BARBITURATES, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN).

Subject Categories : Pharmacology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE