Accession Number : AD0604651

Title :   THE EEG, CONSCIOUSNESS, AND SLEEP,

Corporate Author : RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CALIF

Personal Author(s) : Simon,Charles W. ; Emmons,William H.

Report Date : 15 APR 1955

Pagination or Media Count : 26

Abstract : Monopolar occipital and vertex EEGs were taken from 21 normal, male, alpha-dominant adults during an 8-hour sleep. Information was presented by means of a tape recorder during this period. Subjects reported if they heard the information during stimulation and were later tested, upon rising, to see if they could recall it. These two variables were correlated with electroencephalographic patterns occurring during the information presentation. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) the probability of remembering and responding to meaningful auditory stimulation increased as the quantity and quality of waking alpha within the immediate vicinity increased; (2) the absence of alpha does not mean unconsciousness; (3) the presence of delta is an indication of unconciousness; unconciousness is directly related to delta amplitude and inversely related to delta frequency; (4) Several seconds of EEG scored by eye is a reliable measure of the state of conciousness; and (5) Awakening from sleep or the borderline of sleep as a result of auditory stimulation may lead to patterns showing special stimulus effects which fall along a consciousness continuum relative to the amount of alpha and delta within a pattern.

Descriptors :   SLEEP, ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY, PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, AUDITORY SIGNALS, LEARNING, RECALL, STIMULATION(PHYSIOLOGY), REACTION(PSYCHOLOGY), MALES.

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE