Accession Number : AD0644020

Title :   BARBUDA RECONNAISSANCE.

Descriptive Note : Technical rept.,

Corporate Author : LOUISIANA STATE UNIV BATON ROUGE COASTAL STUDIES INST

Personal Author(s) : Russell,Richard J. ; McIntire,William G.

Report Date : 15 SEP 1966

Pagination or Media Count : 62

Abstract : Barbuda, northeastern island of the Lesser Antilles, a short distance north of Antigua, is surrounded by coral reefs and shallow water that excludes landing by other than small craft. Its approaches are ordinarily considered the most dangerous in the West Indies, and many wrecks are strewn along its reefs. This low, trade-wind island consists wholly of Quaternary coral reef-flat debris. Almost lacking in soil, it offers extremely limited agricultural possibilities and bears a vegetational cover of dry woodland more xerophytic in appearance than might be suggested by 39-inch annual rainfall. The limestone surface bears no streams, but adequate ground water occurs at shallow depth, most of which is brackish, but useful for stock, irrigation, or even drinking. The 1100 inhabitants are descended from slaves who live as a highly socialistic group under the administration of a Warden from the Government of Antigua, depending on remittances from abroad for most of their small income. The paper describes Recent and late Pleistocene reefal and clastic deposits, gives considerable attention to origin of beach cusps and accretion deposits with conspicuous beach-ridge systems, and emphasizes similarities between deposition taking place today and during a 20-foot high stand of late Pleistocene seas. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*LESSER ANTILLES, GEOGRAPHY), BEACHES, CORAL REEFS, TERRAIN, LIMESTONE, ROCK, SAND

Subject Categories : Geology, Geochemistry and Mineralogy

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE