Accession Number : AD0645857

Title :   EFFECT OF REDUCED BAROMETRIC PRESSURE ON THE SECRETORY FUNCTION OF SALIVARY GLANDS,

Corporate Author : FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OHIO

Personal Author(s) : Filippovich,S. I.

Report Date : 03 AUG 1966

Pagination or Media Count : 26

Abstract : Experiments conducted on people and animals at reduced barometric pressure in a pressure chamber at different altitudes (from 4000 to 10000 m) gave the following results: The first ascents after 4-5 hours in the pressure chamber produced an appreciable decrease in the secretion of salivary glands in response to a food stimulant and to acid, this decrease being frequently replaced by an increase in secretion in the following days. The aftereffect in dogs continued for up to five to seven days, and in man, three to four days. The first ascents produced an increase (frequently abrupt) of spontaneous salivation. A decrease in the organic components of the saliva of dogs at altitude was observed, and also an increase in the amount of urea in the saliva; in people (4000 m altitude) an increase in the dense residue and in many cases an increase in the diastatic strength of the saliva and an increase in urea were observed. In oxygen inhalation, the above-described changes in people (altitudes up to 8 km) were expressed to a considerably lesser degree, and were completely absent in dogs in most cases (altitudes up to 10 km). In repeated ascents, the period of the aftereffect gradually became shorter. In dogs after four to five ascents without oxygen, the changes were observed only in the pressure chamber itself, and the aftereffect disappeared. Adaptation phenomena occurred faster and were more stable in short-term and systematic ascents. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*SALIVARY GLANDS, SECRETION), BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, ALTITUDE, SALIVA, HUMANS, DOGS, RESPONSE(BIOLOGY), UREA, OXYGEN, ADAPTATION(PHYSIOLOGY), AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM, STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY), USSR

Subject Categories : Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE