Accession Number : AD0654547

Title :   BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF BIRDS IN AIRPORT ENVIRONMENTS.

Descriptive Note : Interim rept. 29 Jul 64-30 Jun 65,

Corporate Author : BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE WASHINGTON D C DIV OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH

Personal Author(s) : Seubert,John L.

Report Date : JAN 1966

Pagination or Media Count : 53

Abstract : Bird strikes were associated with 162 U. S. and 39 foreign airports since 1961. Herring gulls, greater scaup and shore birds were the chief bird hazards observed at Kennedy Airport. Little has been done at Logan Airport to eliminate adjacent gull food sources and airport ponds, or to alter tidal flats. About 17,000 photographs of Weather Bureau WSR-57 radarscopes were taken in a study of waterfowl hazards to aircraft in the Mississippi Flyway. Egg breaking and spraying eggs with an oil-formaldehyde-water mixture were about equally effective in reducing herring gull production. Gull populations that are denied food move many miles to new sources. Studies of gull population dynamics indicate that error inherent in banding data renders them meaningless for measuring survival. Productivity and population data indicate a doubling of the herring gull population in New England every 15 years. A starling problem was solved at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, by using an experimental contact avicide. Improved instrumentation permitted more exacting analyses of similarities and differences between sounds of Electra engines and singing insects. Starlings did not appear attracted to a variety of amplified sounds, including those of insects and Electra engines. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*BIRDS, *PEST CONTROL), (*AIRPORTS, *AVIATION SAFETY), AVIATION ACCIDENTS, HAZARDS, REPRODUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY), REDUCTION, AIRCRAFT, DAMAGE

Subject Categories : Terminal Flight Facilities

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE