Accession Number : AD0655938

Title :   THE EFFECTS OF POSTURE, BREATHING PRESSURE, AND IMMERSION IN WATER ON LUNG VOLUMES AND INTRAPULMONARY PRESSURES.

Descriptive Note : Final rept. Jul 64-Jun 65,

Corporate Author : OHIO STATE UNIV COLUMBUS

Personal Author(s) : Thompson,Leonard James ; McCally,Michael ; Hyde,A. S.

Report Date : MAY 1967

Pagination or Media Count : 46

Abstract : Lung volumes were measured by spirometry and single breath helium dilution in five subjects under various combinations of posture, breathing pressure, and headout neutral temperature immersion. Tidal volume was unaltered. Vital capacity was reduced significantly only by negative pressure breathing during seated immersion. Seated immersion decreased total lung capacity and functional residual capacity, but the supine posture underwater partially restored these decreases. Positive pressure breathing increased total lung capacity and residual volume for the seated subject in both air and water. A wide range of transthoracic pressure gradients is subjectively more comfortable than a slight increase in the transpharyngeal pressure gradient, suggesting that during immersion, intrapulmonic pressures are selected by the subject to minimize the transpharyngeal pressure gradient. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*PHYSIOLOGY, *UNDERWATER), LUNG, VOLUME, PRESSURE BREATHING, POSTURE(PHYSIOLOGY), HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE, STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY)

Subject Categories : Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE