Accession Number : AD0661329

Title :   BAT COLLISIONS WITH HIGH PERFORMANCE AIRCRAFT,

Corporate Author : SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION WASHINGTON D C

Personal Author(s) : Williams,Timothy C. ; Williams,Janet M. ; Buechner,Helmut K.

Report Date : NOV 1967

Pagination or Media Count : 13

Abstract : Microscopic examination of animal remains from 'birdstrikes' showed that bats account for at least some of the 'birdstrikes' reported at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas. The distribution of the Mexican Free-tailed bat during the night at ground level seems to be constant in all locations tested in and near the base; concentrations of a second species of bats, probably Myotis velifer occur around strong lights which attract insects. Mexican Free-tailed bats emerging from the Bracken Cave near the base do so in dense clusters of 100-1000 animals; some of these bats fly at least 2000'AGL. Some of these bats or clusters of bats are identifiable on MPN 16 Radar, and areas of maximum concentration can be detected. At night in late October the concentration of bats from ground level to 1500 feet averages about one bat/million cubic feet. Above 1500 feet the concentration of birds increases. It is believed that much information regarding the density of flying animals is presently available through radar systems and that this information, if utilized, would be of vital importance to aircraft. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*AIRCRAFT, *AVIATION ACCIDENTS), (*BATS, HAZARDS), IMPACT SHOCK, DISTRIBUTION, RADAR EQUIPMENT, IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS, AVIATION SAFETY

Subject Categories : Safety Engineering

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE