Accession Number : AD0674685

Title :   ESTABLISHING CERTAIN PARAMETERS OF HAZARDS TO AIRCRAFT BY MIGRATING BIRDS IN THE MISSISSIPPI FLYWAY.

Descriptive Note : Interim rept.,

Corporate Author : BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE WASHINGTON D C DIV OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH

Personal Author(s) : Bellrose,Frank C.

Report Date : NOV 1967

Pagination or Media Count : 79

Abstract : Because of their numbers and size, migrating waterfowl constitute a potential hazard to aircraft. Because waterfowl migrate along definite flight routes and within a certain 'fixed' chronology, the places and times of their passage can be predicted within certain limits. The Mississippi Flyway receives the heaviest waterfowl traffic in the United States, so this report is primarily concerned with this flyway. However, several important routes leading to the Atlantic Flyway cross the Mississippi Flyway, requiring that some treatment of the Atlantic Flyway be included. The routes used by migrating waterfowl are mapped--for dabbling ducks, diving ducks, Canada geese, and blue and snow geese. The volume of waterfowl traffic is delineated where possible. Most waterfowl migrate at night and at relatively low altitudes, thereby reducing the potential hazard to aircraft. Knowledge of the altitudes utilized by migrating waterfowl offers a means of reducing the bird strike potential through changes in altitude assignments. Waterfowl passage is greatest following cold fronts in fall, especially between mid-October and December, and following warm fronts in the spring, especially between March 1 and April 10. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*AVIATION SAFETY, BIRDS), (*AIR TRAFFIC, HAZARDS), (*BIRDS, HAZARDS), AIRCRAFT, GEESE, FLIGHT PATHS, ALTITUDE, IMPACT, MISSISSIPPI, PERIODIC VARIATIONS

Subject Categories : Biology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE