Accession Number : AD0689841

Title :   PRIMATE ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, PARTICULARLY RELATED TO SLEEP.

Descriptive Note : Final rept.,

Corporate Author : NEW MEXICO UNIV ALBUQUERQUE

Personal Author(s) : Rhodes,John M.

Report Date : MAR 1969

Pagination or Media Count : 76

Abstract : In a series of studies evaluating sleep in lower primates it was possible to demonstrate that sleep staging criteria are more similar to humans than lower animals. However, within the primate scale the lower primates have shorter stages as well as interspecies differences. These interspecies differences suggest the possibility of studying specific stages more advantageable in one species than another. From the definition of primate sleep similarities it was possible to study sleep deprivation effects. The deprivation effects are similar to man at the extreme level, that is deep sleep (Stage 4 and paradoxical) is the first to recover and is most necessary for recovery of basic function. However, the evidence was highly suggestive that the recovery of lighter sleep stages (particularly Stage 2) was related to recovery of a subjective sense of well-being. This latter aspect would appear to be most crucial for the return of 'good' decision making. In other studies investigating electrical activity of the lower primate brain under conditions of rapid decompression it was found that EEG correlates were early prognosticators of a return to performance. It was also possible to identify, in the chimpanzee, an electrical rhythm recordable from the uncus that seemed to be related to the emotional significance of an odor. Other work covered describes how cortical temperature differs from lower primates to lower mammals, evoked response differences within different primate species, biochemical differences between parenteral and ventrical injections. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*PRIMATES, ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY), (*ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, SLEEP), BODY TEMPERATURE, RESPONSE(BIOLOGY), BIOCHEMISTRY, BRAIN, ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY, FATIGUE(PHYSIOLOGY), BEHAVIOR, MONKEYS

Subject Categories : Anatomy and Physiology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE