Accession Number : AD0701065

Title :   BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF BRAIN INJURY AND THEIR MODIFICATION.

Descriptive Note : Final rept. 1 Mar 60-31 Oct 68,

Corporate Author : WASHINGTON SCHOOL OF PSYCHIATRY D C

Personal Author(s) : Weinstein,Edwin A.

Report Date : 10 FEB 1970

Pagination or Media Count : 13

Abstract : The purpose was to study changes in symbolic behavior associated with brain injury and to derive a model of the way language, particularly metaphorical speech serves as a mode of adaptation to stress. Phonetic-semantic and socially organized patterning mechanisms and their combinations were compared in patients with left and right hemisphere lesions. The phenomena of anosognosia, disorientation, reduplication and confabulation were considered not only from the standpoint of time, place, person and event but as highly condensed symbolic representations of personal problems and relationships. These fictitious designations of the environment are perceived as valid when the symbol becomes an element in a pattern of social relatedness. In the course of clinical recovery from brain trauma, confabulations and reduplicative delusion are replaced by analogous language patterns; cliches, humor, anecdotes and other forms of 'social language' which serve a comparable adaptive role. There is a relationship between language in the acute stage of acute brain injuries and later symptomatology, notably conversion hysteria, psychosomatic symptoms and sexual behavior. The principles evolved were applied in studies of political symbolism, in an analysis of Presidential assassination threats and behavioral disturbances associated with Presidential incapacity. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*BRAIN, WOUNDS AND INJURIES), (*MENTAL DISORDERS, BRAIN), LANGUAGE, ADAPTATION(PHYSIOLOGY), STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY), PSYCHIATRY, PARAPSYCHOLOGY, RECOVERY, BEHAVIOR

Subject Categories : Psychology
      Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE