Accession Number : AD0727123

Title :   Final Report, November 1, 1967-October 30, 1970,

Corporate Author : PRITZKER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CHICAGO ILL DEPT OF SURGERY

Personal Author(s) : Replogle,Robert L.

Report Date : 31 OCT 1970

Pagination or Media Count : 34

Abstract : Adequate volume restoration has long been known to be the primary consideration in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock. Refinements in experimental techniques in recent years has permitted more sophisticated insights into the subtlties of microcirculatory flow behavior, stimulated by the observations of many workers that it is the extent of the reduced tissue perfusion in shock which determines its deleterious effects. There are several considerations affecting the decision to use any one of several fluids for replacing blood loss. First is the capacity for expanding and maintaining intravascular volume; second is the capability for providing adequate nutritional and respiratory circulatory support; third is he tendency for favorably influencing rheological or microcirculatory flow characteristics and fourth, the logistics of cost, availability, storage characteristics and other paramedical considerations. This study was designed to permit direct comparison of four fluids commonly used for volume restoration in an experimental manner analogous to the clinical situation. Emphasis was on obtaining physiological and metabolic data, although blood was studied for rheological behavior using a newly designed couette viscometer, the MTI rheogoniometer.

Descriptors :   (*SHOCK(PATHOLOGY), BODY FLUIDS), (*HEMORRHAGE, SHOCK(PATHOLOGY)), BLOOD CIRCULATION, BLOOD, RHEOLOGY, BLOOD VOLUME, THERAPY, BLOOD PRESSURE, RESPIRATORY SYSTEM, CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM, PHYSIOLOGY, METABOLISM, PATHOLOGY

Subject Categories : Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE