Accession Number : AD0801282

Title :   STRESS-CORROSION CRACKING AND HYDROGEN-STRESS CRACKING OF HIGH-STRENGTH STEEL,

Corporate Author : BATTELLE MEMORIAL INST COLUMBUS OH DEFENSE METALS INFORMATION CENTER

Personal Author(s) : Fletcher, E. E. ; Berry, W. E. ; Elsea, A. R.

Report Date : 29 JUL 1966

Pagination or Media Count : 20

Abstract : High-strength steels are susceptible to delayed cracking under suitable conditions. Frequently such a brittle failure occurs at a stress that is only a fraction of the nominal yield strength. Considerable controversy exists over whether such failures result from two separate and distinct phenomena or whether there is but one mechanism called by two different names. Stress-corrosion cracking is the process in which a crack propagates, at least partially, by the stress induced corrosion of a susceptible metal at the advancing tip of the stress-corrosion crack. There is considerable evidence that this cracking results from the electrtrochemical corrosion of a metal subjected to tensile stresses, either residual or externally applied. Hydrogen-stress cracking is cracking which occurs as the result of hydrogen in the metal lattice in combination with tensile stresses. Hydrogen-stress cracking cannot occur if hydrogen is prevented from entering the steel, or if hydrogen that has entered during processing or service is removed before permanent damage has occurred. It is generally agreed that corrosion plays no part in the actual fracture mechanism. This report was prepared to point out wherein the two fracture mechanisms under consideration are similar and wherein they differ. From the evidence available today, the present authors have concluded that there are two distinct mechansims of delayed failure. (Author)

Descriptors :   *FRACTURE(MECHANICS)), (*STEEL, (*STRESS CORROSION, STEEL), HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT, ELECTROCHEMISTRY, STRESSES, TENSILE PROPERTIES, FAILURE(MECHANICS), PROPAGATION, MARTENSITE.

Subject Categories : Properties of Metals and Alloys
      Mechanics

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE