Accession Number : AD0837815

Title :   THE EFFECTS OF PHYSICAL CONDITIONING AND PARTIAL ACCLIMATIZATION TO HYPOXIA ON WORK TOLERANCE AT HIGH ALTITUDES.

Descriptive Note : Final rept. 1 Jun 65-30 Jun 68,

Corporate Author : OHIO STATE UNIV COLUMBUS

Personal Author(s) : Billings, Charles E. ; Mathews, Donald K. ; Bartels, Robert L. ; Fox, Edward L. ; Bason, Robert

Report Date : JUN 1968

Pagination or Media Count : 232

Abstract : Studies of the physical conditioning process in college students indicated that an interval training program involving running was more effective than a program of calisthenics and marching in improving cardiovascular endurance, while requiring much less training time. Further studies showed that an efficient 13-week program of physical conditioning need involve only 2-3 hours weekly of short, hard runs interspersed with some longer endurance runs. When conditioned and sedentary men were studied during three weeks at 12,500 ft. (3800 M.), it was found that fitness conveys no protection against altitude sickness. Work capacity improved during three weeks at altitude but never approached sea level capacity. It appeared that exposure to hypoxia acted to improve physical fitness in sedentary subjects. There was evidence that extremely fit subjects suffered greater decrements in work capacity at altitude than did less highly conditioned men. Changes in serum lipids and enzymes, possibly due to stress, were encountered during the altitude exposure. The military implications of the study were discussed; recommendations were made, including recommended guidelines for work intensity and duration during the early phase of acclimatization to altitude. Medical findings and ways of minimizing disability due to acute mountain sickness were described. Moderate activity during the early phase of altitude exposure is thought to be helpful in hastening acclimatization. (Author)

Descriptors :   (*PHYSICAL FITNESS, ACCLIMATIZATION), (*ADAPTATION(PHYSIOLOGY), HIGH ALTITUDE), HYPOXIA, EXERCISE(PHYSIOLOGY), TRAINING, STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY), TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), OXYGEN CONSUMPTION, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS, CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM, ERGOMETERS, ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, RESPIRATORY SYSTEM, METABOLISM, GAS ANALYSIS, PULSE RATE, BLOOD SERUM, LIPIDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES.

Subject Categories : Anatomy and Physiology
      Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE