Accession Number : ADA114763

Title :   A Study of Wind Shear Effects on Aircraft Operations and Safety in Australia,

Corporate Author : AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABS MELBOURNE (AUSTRALIA)

Personal Author(s) : Anderson, K W ; Clark, B A J

PDF Url : ADA114763

Report Date : Mar 1981

Pagination or Media Count : 92

Abstract : Wind shear has been identified as a causal or contributory factor in numerous aircraft accidents in Australia and elsewhere. The prospect of remote sensing equipment for measuring wind shear becoming available led to this study of the ergonomics aspects of aircraft operation in conditions of local variations of wind. Questionnaires completed by 652 military and civilian Australian pilots and air traffic controllers (ATCs) were analysed for subject understanding, detection of wind difficulties, frequency of wind shear and downdraft situations, pilot techniques and forewarning methods. It seems that the term wind shear is familiar to many operators but is subject to various interpretations. Specific definitions (like positive wind shear, reverse wind shear, etc.) were often misunderstood. Standard terminology and improved teaching for pilots and ATCs is recommended, along with an extension of theoretical work on optimal piloting techniques in wind shear and other local variations of wind. Pilots often found terrain-induced downdrafts, especially at Nowra, Perth and Pearce, and thunderstorm wind shears troublesome. Operations in irregular terrain away from major aerodromes were frequently cited for wind shear hazards. Pilot judgements on the most susceptible aircraft types were not readily explicable in terms of size, landing speed or wing loading. Pilots and ATCs indicated that currently used cues in wind shear conditions include visual estimates of glideslope departures, precision approach radar observations and aircraft-based measurements of wind or ground speed. Recently developed ground-based remote sensing equipment appears to offer promise for detecting stable wind shears.

Descriptors :   *WIND SHEAR, AUSTRALIA, DETECTION, HAZARDS, AIRCRAFT, AIRPORTS, APPROACH, AIRCRAFT LANDINGS, WARNING SYSTEMS, PUBLIC OPINION, PILOTS, QUESTIONNAIRES, STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Subject Categories : Meteorology
      Aerodynamics

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE