Accession Number : ADA182616

Title :   The Militia's Role in National Defense: A Historical Perspective.

Descriptive Note : Final rept.,

Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLL STRATEGIC STUDIES INST CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s) : Newland,Samuel J

PDF Url : ADA182616

Report Date : 15 May 1987

Pagination or Media Count : 50

Abstract : This study shows that Congress has had constitutional authority over militia training standards since that document's ratification. Congress did not, however, exert this authority until the 20th century, beginning with the Dick Act of 1903. Since the Dick Act, there has been a gradual and incremental extension of congressional control over the organization, arming and training of the National Guard. A key element in process was the passage of the 1933 amendments to the 1920 Defense Act. The amendments created the National Guard of the United States, an organization identical to the National Guard of the various states but which served as a national reserve component with clear national responsibilities. Given the trend for more congressional authority, seen in a historical perspective, and the current reliance placed on reserve component units, Congress is unlikely to retreat from its increasingly strong role in setting standards for the Guard. The study provides a brief review of the militia's use in America's wars and highlights the instances in the past where state versus national authority has been an issue. In addition, it provides an accurate and up-to-date summation of the major congressional acts that provide a basis for today's National Guard.

Descriptors :   *NATIONAL GUARD, *MILITARY TRAINING, *NATIONAL DEFENSE, WARFARE, MILITARY RESERVES, SETTING(ADJUSTING), STANDARDS, MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS, MILITARY FORCES(UNITED STATES)

Subject Categories : Personnel Management and Labor Relations
      Civil Defense

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE