Accession Number : ADA185670

Title :   The Effect of Latitude on the Development of Tropical Cyclones.

Descriptive Note : Master's thesis,

Corporate Author : AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH

Personal Author(s) : Pickle, John D

PDF Url : ADA185670

Report Date : Jan 1987

Pagination or Media Count : 100

Abstract : The three-layer balanced axisymmetric tropical cyclone model developed by Ooyama (1969) is generalized by relaxing the balance approximation and replacing the incompressible fluid layers with compressible fluid layers in isentropic coordinates. In numerical simulations the effects of latitude are non-linear; storms that intensify the fastest (at 100 deg N) do not intensify the most. When latitude is changed with other parameters held constant, storms between 20 and 30 deg N intensify the most. When the latitudinal change in sea surface temperature is considered, storms between 15 and 25 deg N intensify the most. The latter agrees with climatological trends observed in the western Pacific during 1980-1982. The effect of latitude is the dominant control of minimum surface pressure attained for lower latitudes (10 deg N ); whereas northward, the effects of latitude and sea surface temperature are dominant. The size of storms is largely dependent upon latitude, where larger storms occur at more northerly latitudes. Latitude influences the development of tropical cyclone growth by controlling the magnitude and radius of maximum updraft. At lower latitudes, the zone of maximum updraft occurs closer to the center of the storm producing aerially smaller storms, and the rate of heating is greater than for more northerly storms. Both factors, combined with the increased heating efficiency caused by higher inertial stability values, allow the storm to intensify rapidly.

Descriptors :   *LATITUDE, *TROPICAL CYCLONES, BALANCE, CLIMATE, PATTERNS, FLUIDS, LAYERS, INERTIAL SYSTEMS, STABILITY, NUMERICAL ANALYSIS, STORMS, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, EFFICIENCY, HEATING, COORDINATES, ISENTROPE, RADIUS(MEASURE), PACIFIC OCEAN, GROWTH(GENERAL), SURFACE TEMPERATURE, SEA WATER, RATES, ATMOSPHERE MODELS, MOISTURE, WEST(DIRECTION), NONLINEAR SYSTEMS, ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE, LATENT HEAT, LAPSE RATE, INTENSITY, THESES

Subject Categories : Meteorology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE