Accession Number : ADA190344

Title :   Health Risks of U.S. Navy Diving

Descriptive Note : Final rept.

Corporate Author : NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA

Personal Author(s) : Hoiberg, Anne

PDF Url : ADA190344

Report Date : 01 SEP 1987

Pagination or Media Count : 52

Abstract : The purpose of this report was to summarize and evaluate in one volume studies that examined the short- and long-term health effects associated with being a U.S. Navy diver during the time from January 1968 through December 1979. Results showed that enlisted male divers (n= 11,584) had significantly higher hospitalization rates than controls for environmentally induced disorders as well as joint disorders, respiratory diseases, and deflected nasal septum at ages 23-28. Diving officers had higher hospitalization rates than other officers for joint and neurological disorders. Other potential diving-related health risks included musculoskeletal disorders among UDT/SEAL divers and respiratory diseases and pain symtomatology among master divers. The aftereffects of decompression sickness consisted of the two diagnostic clusters of symptoms and headache and disorders of the arteries and veins. Three lives were lost to air embolism, and three divers suffered ear and hearing problems because of a barotrauma incident. Other results showed that inexperienced enlisted divers and officers as well as nongraduates from training were at increased risk of being hospitalized for stress-related conditions, especially alcohol/drug abuse.

Descriptors :   *STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY), *HEALTH SURVEYS, *DIVING, VOLUME, HIGH RATE, RISK, NAVAL PERSONNEL, AIR, HEALTH, ENLISTED PERSONNEL, SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS, LONG RANGE(TIME), CLUSTERING, DIAGNOSIS(GENERAL), NAVAL OPERATIONS, MALES, PAIN, HOSPITALIZATIONS, BAROMETERS, DIVERS, SEALS(STOPPERS), HEARING, VEINS, TRAUMA, OFFICE PERSONNEL, EAR, GAS EMBOLISM, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS, RESPIRATORY DISEASES, ALCOHOLISM, DRUG ABUSE, OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, HEADACHES, MUSCULOSKELETAL DISEASES.

Subject Categories : Medicine and Medical Research
      Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE