Accession Number : ADA192972

Title :   A Cockpit Natural Language Study - Selected Transcripts.

Descriptive Note : Final rept. Oct 86-Dec 87,

Corporate Author : MIDWEST SYSTEMS RESEARCH INC DAYTON OH

Personal Author(s) : Small, Ronald L ; Flory, Dan E ; Munger, Michael P ; Williamson, David T ; Hollis, Bryon T

PDF Url : ADA192972

Report Date : Apr 1988

Pagination or Media Count : 310

Abstract : This third report on the Cockpit Natural Language (CNL) study contains a brief description of the purpose and methodology of the CNL study, a section on lessons learned, scenario situation descriptions, a glossary and transcripts from 9 of the 54 pilots interviewed. Pilot comments cover the issues and implementation details of automation, displays, voice interaction and artificially-intelligent computer aids. Lessons learned from the CNL study include (1) Voice interaction is best employed as a new channel of information transfer, not just as a backup mode for manual or visual channels. For example, voice should be used at the intent-level (e.g., avoid SAM which means to re-plan route, altitude, etc. to avoid enemy surface-to-air missile detection), or to command multiple aircraft subsystems simultaneously (e.g. target helicopter, which means to achieve a radar lock on the helicopter and select an air-to-air missile), not just to replace a single switch actuation (e.g. select air-to-air missile), which is done quicker manually than verbally. (2) Pilot-cockpit voice interaction requires a shared information context between the pilot and the cockpit's computer in order to ensure that pilot commands are properly understood and executed. (3) Role-playing works (even with a low-fidelity cockpit simulation) when extracting valuable information from a pilot community. And (4), voice-activated computer messages should not replace pilot-to-pilot communications (radio calls, hand signals) because of the value of knowing that the other pilot (e.g., wingman) actually received the message.

Descriptors :   *COCKPITS, *NATURAL LANGUAGE, ACTUATION, AIR TO AIR MISSILES, AIRCRAFT, AIRCRAFT EQUIPMENT, CHANNELS, COMMUNITIES, COMPUTERS, ENEMY, GUIDED MISSILE DETECTION, HANDS, HELICOPTERS, INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, INFORMATION TRANSFER, INTERACTIONS, OPTICAL IMAGES, PILOTS, SCENARIOS, SHARING, SIGNALS, SIMULATION, SURFACE TO AIR MISSILES, SWITCHES, TARGETS, VOICE COMMUNICATIONS, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, MESSAGE PROCESSING, SEMANTICS, HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING, AVIONICS, SPEECH ANALYSIS

Subject Categories : Aircraft
      Psychology
      Voice Communications

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE