Accession Number : ADA243393

Title :   American Prisoners of Japan: Did Rank have Its Privilege?

Descriptive Note : Master's thesis Aug 90-Jun 91,

Corporate Author : ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MIL ITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s) : Zarate, Michael A.

Report Date : 07 JUN 1991

Pagination or Media Count : 254

Abstract : This thesis examines the story of American POWs held by the Japanese in WWII to see if there were significant differences in treatment based on rank. It examines how the Japanese treated the prisoners according to international law and also distinctions made by the officers themselves simply because of higher rank. The thesis begins by discussing the historical framework for POW rank distinctions by looking at past wars and the development of rank distinctions in international rules. It then covers the American WWII POW experience in the Far East from Bataan and Corregidor to the war's end. Special emphasis is placed on distinctions made in food, housing, pay, medical care, camp administration, work requirements, escape opportunities, transportation, leadership problems, and overall death rates. The study concludes that there were significant differences in treatment based on rank. These differences caused extremely high enlisted death rates during the first year of captivity. The officers fared worse as a group, however, because the Japanese held them in the Philippines until late 1944 because international rules prevented the Japanese from using officers in Japan's labor camps.

Descriptors :   FACILITIES, FOOD, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL LAW, JAPAN, LABOR, LEADERSHIP, MEDICAL SERVICES, MILITARY FACILITIES, MORTALITY RATE, PHILIPPINES, PRISONERS, PRISONERS OF WAR, RANK ORDER STATISTICS, REQUIREMENTS, THESES, WARFARE.

Subject Categories : Personnel Management and Labor Relations
      Geography
      Humanities and History

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE