Accession Number : ADA251209

Title :   Enemy Prisoners of War (EPW) Operations during Operation Desert Storm

Descriptive Note : Research paper

Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s) : Bilbo, Jon F.

PDF Url : ADA251209

Report Date : 15 APR 1992

Pagination or Media Count : 225

Abstract : On 2 August 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait. Almost five months later, after numerous attempts to get Saddam Hussein to peacefully withdraw his forces from Kuwait and abide with the United Nations Security Council's Resolutions, the United States and its other 35 Arab and non-Arab coalition allies began the war to liberate Kuwait. After 38 days of around-the-clock bombing and 100 hours of devastating ground combat, the fourth largest army in the world had been driven out of Kuwait and soundly defeated. By the end of the war, 3,700 of 4,280 battle tanks, 2,600 of 3,110 assorted artillery pieces, and 2,400 of 2,870 assorted other armored vehicles were destroyed. Additionally, up to 42 Iraqi divisions were either destroyed, captured, or rendered combat ineffective. Finally, over 69,000 enemy prisoners of war (EPW), the largest number of EPWs captured and interned by the United States since World War II, were captured and turned over to Saudi control. This paper analyzes how the U.S. Army's active and reserve component (AC/RC) military police units deployed to Saudi Arabia performed their EPW missions during Operation Desert Storm. It begins with a discussion of the Army's current doctrine on how to perform EPW operations, examining Military Police (MP) organizational structures, missions, concepts, and planning considerations. Next, the author describes the AC/RC MP units that deployed to the Gulf; how they were organized to accomplish their missions; and the theater concept of operations for evacuating, receiving and processing, interning, and transferring U.S., British, and French EPWs to the Saudi military for future repatriation operations with Iraq. Finally, the author discusses some of weaknesses of the operation and recommends solutions to improve EPW doctrine, force structure, and equipment capabilities so that the smaller Army of the future can meet all of its international obligations under the 1949 Geneva Conventions for the Protection of War Victims.

Descriptors :   *MILITARY OPERATIONS, *LESSONS LEARNED, *ARMY, *MILITARY POLICE, *ENEMY, *PRISONERS OF WAR, *PERSIAN GULF WAR, MILITARY INTELLIGENCE, ARABS, MILITARY DOCTRINE, MISSIONS, INTERROGATION, SAUDI ARABIA, PSYCHOLOGICAL OPERATIONS, POSTWAR OPERATIONS, CIVIL AFFAIRS, REGULATIONS, ARMY PLANNING, MEDICAL SERVICES, CIVILIAN POPULATION, LOGISTICS, PROCESSING, MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), IRAQ, KUWAIT

Subject Categories : Personnel Management and Labor Relations
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE