Accession Number : ADA263678

Title :   The Role of the U.S. Military in the Drug War: A Litmus Test for the Proper Application of Resources.

Descriptive Note : Study project,

Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s) : Mackiewicz, Thomas L.

Report Date : 15 APR 1993

Pagination or Media Count : 50

Abstract : In September 1989, President Bush announced his National Drug Control Strategy and by directive charged the Department of Defense to become the lead agency in this country's War on Drugs. This war is of major significance to the national security of the United States. The use of drugs has contributed to a decrease in productivity, an increase in crime, loss of life, and a drain on our national economy. Given the shrinking size of the Department of Defense and its commensurate reduction in funds, questions abound as to the viability of the use of the services in the drug war, and what they can possibly accomplish. This paper will examine the current drug war, assess the military feasibility through the application of the Weinberger Doctrine, and recommend changes to better align the program with President Clinton's administration. The study concludes that the military undoubtedly does have a role in combating drugs, one that can be done better in the future era of resource scarcity and downsizing by switching efforts away from supply reduction to demand reduction.

Descriptors :   *DRUGS, CONTROL, CRIMES, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, DOCTRINE, MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL SECURITY, PRODUCTIVITY, REDUCTION, RESOURCES, SECURITY, STRATEGY, SUPPLIES, SWITCHING, UNITED STATES, VIABILITY, ECONOMICS, MILITARY OPERATIONS, DRUG INTERDICTION, DEMAND(ECONOMICS).

Subject Categories : Sociology and Law
      Government and Political Science
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE