Accession Number : ADA288667

Title :   What Are the Impacts to National Security for the Department of Defense to Comply With the Mobility Fuel Requirements in the Clean Air Act of 1990?

Descriptive Note : Research rept. Aug 93-Apr 94,

Corporate Author : NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV WASHINGTON DC

Personal Author(s) : Wright, James E.

PDF Url : ADA288667

Report Date : APR 1994

Pagination or Media Count : 33

Abstract : The Department of Defense's (DoD) strategy to minimize the number of bulk fuels conflicts with provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAA-90). When DoD uses JP-8 in ground vehicles, it must meet the Environmental Protection Agency regulations for diesel emissions. Diesel fuel can't exceed 0.05 percent sulfur by weight, but the specification for JP-8 allows 0.30 percent sulfur by weight. So ground units continue to use diesel fuel in CONUS and convert to JP-8 during deployment. This will affect readiness because JP-8 cleans diesel residue from fuel systems and requires a couple of fuel filter changes to eliminate the problem. Is this conflict a show stopper or perhaps the apparent conflict is really not a problem at all? My premise is that DoD can overcome this conflict by using Low Sulfur JP-8 to ensure high readiness. Two potential obstacles could prevent setting up that policy. If sufficient quantities of Low Sulfur JP-8 aren't available, then implementation is irrelevant. Prohibitive cost could also make this option infeasible. Other options are also explored. In summary, the DoD can retain the great operational and environmental advantages of a single fuel on the battlefield by switching to Low Sulfur JP-8. Low Sulfur JP-8 may offer similar benefits to commercial airlines and the transportation industry.

Descriptors :   *MILITARY REQUIREMENTS, *FUELS, *LEGISLATION, POLICIES, COSTS, LIMITATIONS, SULFUR, MILITARY PLANNING, FUEL CONTAMINATION, LOGISTICS PLANNING, KEROSENE.

Subject Categories : Fuels

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE