Accession Number : ADA290996

Title :   AVIATION SAFETY: Progress Limited With Self-Audit and Safety Violation Reporting Programs.

Corporate Author : GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE WASHINGTON DC RESOURCES COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVE LOPMENT DIV

PDF Url : ADA290996

Report Date : 31 MAR 1992

Pagination or Media Count : 21

Abstract : Although the self-audit and voluntary disclosure programs were announced twice-first in 1987 and then in 1990-progress in implementing both programs has been limited. Of the four major and six smaller airlines we visited, only one believed it met, or planned to meet, FAA'S self-audit guidelines. These 10 airlines carried about 57 percent of the flying public in 1990. Similarly, as of September 1991, voluntary disclosures were limited to 292 reports from 96 aIrlines, or about 3 percent of the 3,031 eligible to participate. The industry appears to be in a "wait and see" posture for two basic reasons. First, the airlines are skeptical that program benefits outweigh their costs. Airlines acknowledge that the self-audit program could marginally increase operational efficiency and that voluntary disclosure savings-they will not have to pay fines-provide a significant incentive to participate. However, the airlines doubt that the programs will provide more than a marginal increase in safety and are concerned that any benefits could be overshadowed by extra staff and other costs associated with the self-audit program. They also fear the potential losses in revenue if FAA cannot protect voluntary disclosures of safety violations from release under the Freedom of Information Act.

Descriptors :   *AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEMS, *AVIATION SAFETY, INDUSTRIES, OPERATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS, COMMERCIAL AVIATION, COSTS, SAFETY, FEAR, LOSSES, BENEFITS.

Subject Categories : Commercial and General Aviation

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE