Accession Number : ADA292681

Title :   Environmental Effects of Dredging. The Value of Wing Dams for Freshwater Mussels.

Corporate Author : ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS ENVIRONMENTAL LAB

Personal Author(s) : Miller, Andrew C. ; Whiting, Robert

PDF Url : ADA292681

Report Date : NOV 1988

Pagination or Media Count : 4

Abstract : This note provides information on the value of wing dams, which reduce dredging requirements in large rivers, for freshwater mussels. Wing dams are longitudinal rock-rubble structures placed in waterways to develop and stabilize channels. Wing dams constrict low flows, which decreases maintenance dredging requirements (Shields 1983). These structures are usually oriented obliquely or at 90 deg to the current. Sediment deposition usually occurs between wing dams where current velocity is reduced relative to that in the unprotected main channel. Wing dams create quiescent areas that are similar to naturally occurring lentic habitats during normal and low flow (Beckett et al. 1983). In addition, wing dams themselves are a coarse-grained substrate used by aquatic insects and fishes (Conner, Pennington, and Bosley 1983; Pennington, Baker, and Bond 1983; and Shields 1983).

Descriptors :   *FRESH WATER, *DREDGING, *DAMS, VELOCITY, MAINTENANCE, REQUIREMENTS, GRAIN SIZE, SUBSTRATES, ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT, DEPOSITION, PROTECTION, FLOW, RIVERS, HABITATS, WINGS, MUSSELS, SEDIMENTS, CHANNELS, WATERWAYS, FISHES, AQUATIC INSECTS.

Subject Categories : Biology
      Hydrology, Limnology and Potamology
      Civil Engineering

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE