Accession Number : ADA292890

Title :   An Evaluation of the Lower Coverage Anti-G Suit Without an Abdominal Bladder After Three Days of Seven Degree Head-Down Tilt.

Descriptive Note : Final rept. 1 Apr 91-1 Apr 92,

Corporate Author : KRUG LIFE SCIENCES SAN ANTONIO TX SAN ANTONIO DIV

Personal Author(s) : Stegman, Barbara J. ; Krutz, Robert W., Jr. ; Burton, Russell R. ; Sawin, Charles F.

PDF Url : ADA292890

Report Date : SEP 1992

Pagination or Media Count : 6

Abstract : During space shuttle reentry, volume-depleted astronauts experience slow-onset, long- duration, low-level +G. In Phase 2, we determined that an extended coverave anti-G suit without an abdominal bladder (Reentry Anti-G Suit (REAGS)) was the most effective anti-G suit in subjects dehydrated with furosemide (Lasix). The present study (Phase 3) verified that REAGS provided effective protection for subjects dehydrated with 7 degrees head-down tilt (HDT). Twelve healthy male subjects were placed at 7 degrees HDT for 3 days, and then subjected to an acceleration profile simulating shuttle reentry while wearing the REAGS suit. Six subjects and their anti-G suit inflated when their eye-level blood pressure (ELBP) fell below 60 mmHg, while six subjects had their suit inflated when they experienced peripheral light dim (PLD). Average REAGS pressure required to maintain ELEp at or above 60 mmHg after HDT was 0.85 psig vs. 1.0 psig in subjects dehydrated with Lasix. One subject in the PLD group experienced (G-LOC); however, this may have been related to the greater cardiovascular stress induced by HDT.

Descriptors :   *ATMOSPHERE ENTRY, *ACCELERATION, *G SUITS, *BLADDERS, STRESSES, LIGHT, PROFILES, SPACE SHUTTLES, CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM, TILT, ABDOMEN.

Subject Categories : Stress Physiology
      Spacecraft Trajectories and Reentry

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE