Accession Number : ADA293379

Title :   The Lost Art of Maritime Mining.

Descriptive Note : Final rept.,

Corporate Author : NAVAL WAR COLL NEWPORT RI

Personal Author(s) : Kusumoto, Neal J.

PDF Url : ADA293379

Report Date : 13 FEB 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 34

Abstract : Maritime minefields have been employed to achieve strategic and operational objectives in the five major American wars of the 20th century. The United States has been both the miner and, most recently, the victim. Mining can strike at the heart of the enemy, take advantage of an Achilles' heel, or compensate for one's own weakness. The U.S. Navy maintains a modest inventory of mines which can be laid in volume by Navy and Air Force aircraft, or covertly by submarines. Today's operational commander faces an increasingly challenging task: tackle a diverse, changing threat with fewer forces and resources without alienating the American public. Minefields can be an integral part of the plan to achieve battlespace dominance and project power. Mining can seize the initiative through surprise, enhance mass and maneuver by achieving economy of force, and expand the commander's battlespace and timeline while compressing those of the enemy. A minefield is a stealthy, persistent, and economical weapon which can deter without killing. Against a maritime foe, the operational commander should consider mining's strategic and operational potential when planning a major operation. (MM)

Descriptors :   *MILITARY HISTORY, *MINEFIELDS, *NAVAL MINE WARFARE, MILITARY STRATEGY, VULNERABILITY, THESES, NAVAL OPERATIONS, DETERRENCE, MINELAYING.

Subject Categories : Humanities and History
      Undersea and Antisubmarine Warfare

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE