Accession Number : ADA294101

Title :   The Brooks Act: An 8-Bit Act in a 64-Bit World? An Investigation of the Brooks Act and Its Implications to the Department of Defense Information Technology Acquisition Process.

Descriptive Note : Research rept. Aug 94-Apr 95,

Corporate Author : INDUSTRIAL COLL OF THE ARMED FORCES WASHINGTON DC

Personal Author(s) : Traaen, Timothy S.

PDF Url : ADA294101

Report Date : APR 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 38

Abstract : Throughout the sixties and seventies, the Federal Government was the largest single buyer and IBM the largest seller of automated data processing equipment in the world. No natural set of interfaces arnong central processing units (CPUs), peripheral equipment, data, or programs existed. Lack of standardization resulted in thousands of hours of unused computer time within the government. In March 1965, the president approved and sent to Congress an OMB report on the management of ADP in Government. The report cited the government's serious ADP management problems. These matters were considered by Congress as the Brooks Act was enacted. The Brooks Act sought improvement in ADPE acquisition processes that would enhance the Government's bargaining position of hardware through volume acquisitions, base rental-versus- purchase evaluations on the value of equipment to the Government as a whole rather than the equipment's useful life to the initial user, and select equipment which offered the greatest purchase advantage on a Government-wide basis.

Descriptors :   *MILITARY PROCUREMENT, *FEDERAL LAW, *DATA PROCESSING EQUIPMENT, DATA PROCESSING, POSITION(LOCATION), CONGRESS, AUTOMATION, ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, COMPUTERS, INTERFACES, TIME, DEFICIENCIES, STANDARDIZATION, CENTRAL PROCESSING UNITS, BARGAINING.

Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Computer Hardware
      Logistics, Military Facilities and Supplies

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE