Accession Number : ADA294290

Title :   Predicting What People Learn From Examples.

Descriptive Note : Final rept. 15 Nov 90-14 Nov 94,

Corporate Author : GEORGIA INST OF TECH ATLANTA SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

Personal Author(s) : Catrambone, Richard

PDF Url : ADA294290

Report Date : 11 MAY 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 75

Abstract : Students often memorize a set of steps from examples in domains such as probability and physics, without inducing what subgoals those steps achieve. Such students fail to solve novel problems with identical goal structures but which do not permit exactly the same set of steps as the examples. This final report contains three papers that examine whether examples can help people to learn relevant subgoals for solving problems in a particular domain, and if learning the subgoals helps them to solve novel problems that involve those subgoals but require new steps for achieving them. It was hypothesized that when learners are encouraged to group steps from example solutions then they will be more likely to learn subgoals, perhaps through a self-explanation process. The connection between grouping and subgoal formation was supported by transfer results as well as analyses of participants' descriptions of how to solve problems. More generally, the fact that subgoals can effectively conveyed by examples and that those subgoals can aid transfer, has important implications for the design of training materials and tutoring environments.

Descriptors :   *PROBLEM SOLVING, *TRANSFER, *LEARNING, STUDENTS, INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS, STRUCTURES, PHYSICS.

Subject Categories : Psychology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE