Accession Number : ADA294385

Title :   Perceptual Dimensions of Simulated Scenes Relevant for Visual Low-Altitude Flight.

Descriptive Note : Interim rept. Jun 88-Nov 93,

Corporate Author : DAYTON UNIV OH RESEARCH INST

Personal Author(s) : Kleiss, James A.

PDF Url : ADA294385

Report Date : APR 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 29

Abstract : Previous experiments using multidimensional scaling reveal that pilots flying at low altitudes perceive two types of detail in real-world scenes: (a) hills and ridges, and (b) discrete scene elements exemplified by large objects or groups of objects. The present experiments sought to determine the extent to which these types of detail can be effectively rendered in computer- generated flight simulator scenes. In Experiment 1, subjects rated the visual similarity between simulated scenes exhibiting a range of different features. Ratings were analyzed with multidimensional scaling which revealed that subjects perceived variation in three types of detail: (a) texture on the terrain, (b)objects, and (c) hills. Evidence for a dimension related to texture on the terrain arose from comparisons involving completely featureless surfaces which were not represented in real-world scenes. Field of view was reduced in Experiment 2 and results revealed a change in perceived detail. Texture, objects and hills were perceived in scenes, but they were perceived as being a single type of detail contributing to global scene complexity. Taken together, present results indicate that detail important in real-world scenes can be effectively rendered in simulated scenes. Indeed, present scenes exhibited an even richer variety of detail than real-world scenes used previously. Nevertheless, what is important in scenes is not directly related to specific scene features but to more abstract forms of information mediated by those features.

Descriptors :   *VISUAL PERCEPTION, *FLIGHT SIMULATORS, SIMULATION, GLOBAL, PILOTS, TERRAIN, FLIGHT, SCALING FACTOR, TEXTURE, PERCEPTION, LOW ALTITUDE.

Subject Categories : Anatomy and Physiology
      Aircraft

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE