Accession Number : ADA294814

Title :   Russian National Security and Foreign Policy in Transition.

Corporate Author : RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA

Personal Author(s) : Rumer, Eugene B.

PDF Url : ADA294814

Report Date : 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 65

Abstract : February 7, 1990, was a day of unprecedented change in the history of the Soviet Union. On that day the Communist Party (CPSU) leadership surrendered its constitutional monopoly on the country's political life and process by agreeing to amend Article VI of the Soviet Constitution, which had previously guaranteed it that right. As often happened during the perestroyka years, that decision lagged behind the real course of political events in the Soviet Union and represented, as many measures taken by the Soviet leaders, a half step that left both opponents and proponents of reforms dissatisfied. But the importance of that highly symbolic step should not be underestimated. The CPSU, which for nearly three-quarters of the 20th century had enjoyed an absolute constitutional monopoly on ideas, had in effect sanctioned political competition and ideological challenge to its dogma. For the first time in Soviet history, citizens were allowed to form and join political parties other than the CPSU. pg11. JMD

Descriptors :   *FOREIGN POLICY, *POLITICAL SCIENCE, *NATIONAL SECURITY, USSR, LEADERSHIP, HISTORY, POLITICAL PARTIES, COMMUNISM.

Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Military Intelligence

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE