Accession Number : ADA296172

Title :   The Costs of the Administration's Plan for the Navy through the Year 2010.

Descriptive Note : Memorandum rept.,

Corporate Author : CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE (U S CONGRESS) WASHINGTON DC

Personal Author(s) : Eland, Ivan ; Singer, Neil ; Thomas, R. W. ; Myers, William P. ; Kohn, Sherwood

PDF Url : ADA296172

Report Date : NOV 1994

Pagination or Media Count : 26

Abstract : In response to threats posed by the former Soviet Union, the Reagan Administration advocated building a 600-ship navy. But the Navy never achieved that level. In fact, the fleet never exceeded 570 ships. As the Soviet threat declined, the Bush Administration proposed a fleet of 450 ships, including 13 aircraft carriers (12 active and one for training). The Clinton Administration has proposed reducing the fleet to about 330 ships by 1999, including 12 aircraft carriers (11 active and one in reserve that can be used for training), 120 to 126 active and reserve surface warships, 45 to 55 attack submarines, about 40 amphibious ships, and 14 ballistic missile submarines. Although the size of the fleet is declining, the Navy is still developing expensive new ships and aircraft that it will begin purchasing in the late 1990s and the next decade. The Navy will develop a new attack submarine, to be purchased in fairly low numbers beginning around the turn of the century, and a new surface combat ship (SC-21), which would be procured in moderate quantities starting in the middle of the next decade. During the next decade, to maintain an aircraft carrier force of 12 ships, the Navy will purchase a new carrier every four years, beginning in 2002. The Navy and Marine Corps will modernize their aircraft fleet, buying the F/A-18E/F and V-22 aircraft beginning in the late 1990s and a medium-attack aircraft emanating from the Joint Attack Strike Technology (JAST) program late in the next decade. These expensive new weapons will have to be financed out of budgets that will probably be considerably smaller than those of the 1980s. Will sufficient funds be available to pay for the new weapons and adequately support smaller, but still substantial, naval forces?

Descriptors :   *NAVAL BUDGETS, *PLANNING PROGRAMMING BUDGETING, USSR, LAND WARFARE, MARINE CORPS, SHIPS, AIRCRAFT, FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT, OCEAN SURFACE, THREATS, QUANTITY, NAVY, COSTS, RESPONSE, AIRCRAFT CARRIERS, BUDGETS, STARTING, NUMBERS, ATTACK SUBMARINES.

Subject Categories : Administration and Management
      Economics and Cost Analysis

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE