Accession Number : ADA298189

Title :   Allelopathic Ability of Various Aquatic Plants to Inhibit the Growth of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Myriophyllum spicatum L.

Descriptive Note : Final rept.,

Corporate Author : ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS

Personal Author(s) : Jones, Harvey L.

PDF Url : ADA298189

Report Date : JUN 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 28

Abstract : The term allelopathy was first coined by Molisch in 1937. In general, the term allelopathy refers to the detrimental effects of higher plants of one species (the donor) on the germination, growth, or development of another species (the recipient) (Putnam 1985). Specifically, allelopathy refers to the biochemical interactions that take place among plants, but its effectiveness depends on the addition of a chemical to the environment (Sutton 1986a). Rice (1974) provided us with a more functional definition as being any direct or indirect harmful effect by one plant (including microorganisms) on another through production of chemical compounds that escape into the environment. Similarly, Parker (1984) defined allelopathy as the harmful effect of one plant or microorganism on another because of the release of secondary metabolic products into the environment.

Descriptors :   *PLANT GROWTH, *AQUATIC PLANTS, PRODUCTION, INTERACTIONS, BIOCHEMISTRY, SECONDARY, METABOLISM, CHEMISTRY, CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS, GERMINATION, BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS.

Subject Categories : Biological Oceanography
      Agronomy, Horticulture and Aquiculture
      Biology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE