Accession Number : ADA299328

Title :   Black Men: Denial and Acceptance during the Civil War, 1861-1863.

Descriptive Note : Master's thesis,

Corporate Author : ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s) : Carter, Evon B.

PDF Url : ADA299328

Report Date : 02 JUN 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 80

Abstract : This study documents the struggle to overcome prejudice and discrimination by black men during the early portion of the Civil War, 1861-1863. This study's focus is on several factors that are crucial in the Lincoln administration's final decision to accept the Negro as a combat soldier. The black man throughout the history of this nation fought and died in the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, and the Mexican War with distinction. His acceptance as anything other than a combat soldier, has married his ability to progress beyond the ranks of a menial enlisted worker in the Army or a cabin boy within the Navy. The policy decisions of the Lincoln administration directly affected how the Negro would be used in the Civil War. The thesis concludes that the overriding reason for the acceptance of blacks as combat soldiers was the need for manpower. The Negro went on to distinguish himself as a fighting combat soldier and would never be denied his place to fight for his country again. The conclusion includes suggestions and areas for further study. jg p.2

Descriptors :   *ARMY PERSONNEL, WARFARE, POLICIES, DECISION MAKING, HUMANS, THESES, MANPOWER.

Subject Categories : Humanities and History
      Government and Political Science
      Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE