Accession Number : ADA302381

Title :   The Effect of Vehicle Noise and Vibration (Caused by Moving Operations) on Cognitive Performance in the Command and Control Vehicle.

Descriptive Note : Final rept.,

Corporate Author : ARMY RESEARCH LAB ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND MD

Personal Author(s) : Tauson, Richard A. ; Doss, N. W. ; Rice, Debra J. ; Tyrol, Douglas E. ; Davidson, Donald

PDF Url : ADA302381

Report Date : OCT 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 55

Abstract : To maintain the pace of modern battle and to support the fielding of digital command and control systems, the U.S. Army needed to develop a new command and control vehicle (C2V). As part of an evaluation of human performance on automated command and control tasks in the C2V, this study attempted to quantify the effect of vehicle movement on computer operators. Fourteen subjects, who had computer and tracked vehicle experience, completed a subset of the Expanded Complex Cognitive Assessment Battery (CCAB) running on U.S. Army tactical command and control system (ATCCS) common hardware in the C2V. The tests were performed in stationary, vehicle idle, road march (secondary road at 20 mph), and cross-country (sandy river bed at 10 mph) conditions. Subjects were exposed to each condition for 30 minutes in the morning and again in the afternoon. After each condition, subjects completed questionnaires about human-machine interface and subjective discomfort. Subjects also completed a stress assessment questionnaire at the beginning of the test, after each cross-country trial, and at the end of the day. Although some subjects experienced discomfort and one was completely incapacitated by motion sickness, vehicle movement did not degrade cognitive performance of most of the test measures. In all cases, subjects were able to operate the computer in all vehicle movement conditions. The questionnaires and stress measurements showed a small effect from vehicle movement. An analysis of variance of the CCAB scores showed a significant degradation in performance for one subtest when idle and road march conditions were compared. The overall conclusion was that, at the speeds tested, the subjects were able to compensate for any stressors caused by vehicle movement.

Descriptors :   *COGNITION, *COMMAND AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, *MOTION SICKNESS, VELOCITY, DIGITAL SYSTEMS, VIBRATION, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), MILITARY VEHICLES, STRESS(PSYCHOLOGY), STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY), MEMORY(PSYCHOLOGY), HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING, ROAD TESTS, TRACKED VEHICLES, MAN MACHINE SYSTEMS, MAN COMPUTER INTERFACE, EXPOSURE(PHYSIOLOGY), OFFROAD TRAFFIC, COMPUTER OPERATORS, TACTICAL DATA SYSTEMS, BACKGROUND NOISE, PSYCHOMOTOR TESTS.

Subject Categories : Stress Physiology
      Command, Control and Communications Systems
      Psychology
      Human Factors Engineering & Man Machine System

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE