Accession Number : ADA302467

Title :   Final Assessment of the Feasibility of a System for Acoustically Detecting Stationary Gas Bubbles Using Time Delay Spectrometry.

Descriptive Note : Technical rept. 1 Oct 93-1 Oct 94,

Corporate Author : NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH INST BETHESDA MD

Personal Author(s) : Albin, G. W. ; Mints, W. H. ; Colton, J. S.

PDF Url : ADA302467

Report Date : OCT 1995

Pagination or Media Count : 55

Abstract : The Jet Propulsion Laboratory swept-frequency bubble detector has been discussed in previous reports (Albin et al., 1991 and 1992). Physically similar to the familiar ultrasound scanning devices for medical imaging, it was designed to nondestructively detect stationary resonant bubbles of < 7 um diameter using time delay spectrometry (TDS), but proved insufficienfly sensitive to do so. This report is a discussion of whether that system could be redesigned successfully. Techniques to improve the signal/noise (S/N) ratio are explored, including exciting larger bubbles at lower frequency. Analysis indicates that the new system should indeed be sensitive enough to detect resonant bubbles in the 40-400 um diameter range. However, the shift to lower frequencies brings with it a problem peculiar to TDS systems: there are multi-path signal arrivals, which in TDS systems translates into a loss of resolution in the time domain. Because identifying the resonance frequencies depends upon the temporal coherence of the signal, the technique cannot work at low frequencies. Various strategies for maintaining time resolution at lower frequencies are discussed, along with the reasons why they will not work. Adequate time resolution is realized at much higher frequencies, but the S/N ratio at those frequencies would be satisfactory only if the acoustical scanning signal were of such high amplitude that the measurement would be destructive to the bubbles and their milieu. It does not appear possible at present to design a TDS system that is simultaneously sensitive enough for the proposed application and nondestructive--such a device will become possible in the future if acoustic transducer sensitivities are improved by several orders of magnitude.

Descriptors :   *SPECTROMETRY, *ULTRASONICS, *BUBBLES, *ACOUSTIC SIGNALS, *DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS, *MEDICAL COMPUTER APPLICATIONS, SCANNING, FREQUENCY, TIME INTERVALS, RATIOS, HIGH RATE, DESTRUCTION, RESOLUTION, X RAYS, GASES, RESONANT FREQUENCY, SIGNALS, SHIFTING, STATIONARY, RESONANCE, DELAY, LOSSES, NOISE, MEDICAL SERVICES, AMPLITUDE, TIME DOMAIN, RADIOGRAPHY, LOW FREQUENCY, MULTIPATH TRANSMISSION, MOTION SICKNESS.

Subject Categories : Medicine and Medical Research
      Medical Facilities, Equipment and Supplies
      Acoustics

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE