Accession Number : ADA306808

Title :   Physical Fitness Training to Improve the Manual Material Handling Capability of Women.

Descriptive Note : Final rept. 23 Jan-30 Sep 95,

Corporate Author : ARMY RESEARCH LAB ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND MD

Personal Author(s) : Knapik, Joseph J. ; Gerber, John

PDF Url : ADA306808

Report Date : APR 1996

Pagination or Media Count : 102

Abstract : This study examined the influence of a combined resistance and aerobic training program on the manual material handling (MMH) capability and road marching performance of female soldiers. Subjects were 21 healthy women, 13 of which completed all phases of the investigation. They trained for 14 weeks, performing progressive resistance training 3 days per week, and running with interval training 2 days per week. Compared to values obtained before training, soldiers increased the maximum mass they could lift from floor to knuckle height by 19% (68 to 81 kg, p 0.001) and from floor to chest height by 16% (49 to 57 kg, p 0.001). They improved by 17% their ability to lift 15 kg as many times as possible in 10-min (167 to 195 lifts, p 0.001), while perception of effort (measured with the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion) did not change. They improved by 4% their maximal effort road march time over a 5 km distance, carrying a 19-kg load mass (44.7 to 43.1 min, p=O.02). While total body mass did not change, body fat mass was reduced by 9% (18.8 to 17.2 kg, p=O.036) and fat free mass increased by 6% (48.2 to 51.0 kg, p 0.001). A short term physical fitness program, conducted about 1 hour per day, 5 days per week can substantially improve female soldiers' MMH capability, result in a small improvement in road marching ability, and provide favorable changes in body composition.

Descriptors :   *HUMAN BODY, *MANUAL OPERATION, *PHYSICAL FITNESS, *WOMEN, *AEROBIC PROCESSES, *MATERIALS HANDLING, TRAINING, ARMY PERSONNEL, MASS, FATS, THORAX, HEIGHT, PERCEPTION, ADIPOSE TISSUE.

Subject Categories : Medicine and Medical Research
      Psychology
      Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE