Accession Number : ADA306988

Title :   Life After Cutbacks: Tracking California's Aerospace Workers.

Descriptive Note : Research rept.,

Corporate Author : RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA

Personal Author(s) : Schoeni, Robert F. ; Dardia, Michael ; McCarthy, Kevin F. ; Vernez, Georges

PDF Url : ADA306988

Report Date : 1996

Pagination or Media Count : 84

Abstract : This study looked at aerospace workers in California between 1989 and 1994 to gauge whether they suffered disproportionate hardships during the defense budget downturns of the late 1980s and early 1990s. The end of the Cold War has brought profound changes to the U.S. military and to sectors of the civilian economy that have been linked closely to the armed services. The new political and economic environment of the 1990s is defined by leaner Pentagon budgets, fewer uniformed personnel, and growing closure lists of bases, shipyards, and other facilities. The aerospace industry has been at the vortex of these contractions. As the Pentagon has become smaller over the past eight or nine years, its need for sophisticated aerospace products has dropped. And for some companies heavily dependent on defense business, minor changes in the Pentagon's budget outlays translate into major dislocations on the factory floor. Nationwide, the aerospace industry's job base has shrunk by 30 percent over the past eight years. Nowhere have those changes been more apparent than in California and the Los Angeles basin. The state in 1987 was home to one in four U.S. aerospace jobs. In Los Angeles County alone, aerospace jobs accounted for 10 percent of the national total. Since then, the aerospace industry in California has become a shadow of its former self. The state's aerospace employment rolls are down 33 percent compared with 1987, while in Los Angeles County the industry's job base is only 50 percent of its size eight years ago. The federal government responded to this industry downturn by setting up programs to assist displaced aerospace workers. While different in scope and focus, these programs all were based on a common assumption that aerospace workers had suffered unique hardships that were directly linked to their industry's defense dependence.

Descriptors :   *CIVILIAN PERSONNEL, *AEROSPACE INDUSTRY, *MILITARY BUDGETS, *MILITARY DOWNSIZING, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, INDUSTRIES, JOBS, COMMERCE, ECONOMICS, CONTRACTORS, DISLOCATIONS, COLD WAR, CALIFORNIA, INDUSTRIAL PLANTS, BASINS(GEOGRAPHIC), SHIPYARDS, LOS ANGELES(CALIFORNIA), UNEMPLOYMENT.

Subject Categories : Economics and Cost Analysis
      Government and Political Science
      Personnel Management and Labor Relations

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE