Accession Number : ADA317528

Title :   An Analysis of Approach Control/Pilot Voice Communications.

Descriptive Note : Final rept.,

Corporate Author : FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION OKLAHOMA CITY OK CIVIL AEROMEDICAL INST

Personal Author(s) : Prinzo, O. V.

PDF Url : ADA317528

Report Date : OCT 1996

Pagination or Media Count : 40

Abstract : This report consists of an analysis of air traffic control and pilot voice communications that occurred at 3 terminal air traffic control facilities (TRACONs). Each transmission was parsed into communication elements. Each communication element was assigned to a speech act category (e.g., address, instruction, request, advisory) and aviation topic (e.g., heading, altitude, speed, readback) and evaluated using the aviation topic-speech act taxonomy (ATSAT, Prinzo, et al., 1995). A total of 12,200 communication elements in 4,500 transmissions make up the database. Communication elements appeared most frequently in the address and instruction speech act categories. Of the 2,500 controller communication elements, 40% contained at least 1 communication error. The number and types of communication errors (message content and delivery technique) located within each speech act category were determined and separate communication error analyses are reported for pilots and controllers by TRACON facility. Of the 5,900 pilot communication elements, 59% contained at least 1 communication error. More than 50% of controllers and pilots communication errors occurred in the instruction speech act category. Generally, controllers omitted key words that pertained to radio frequency, airspeed, or approach/departure instructions. Pilots only partially read back instructions involving heading, radio frequency, and airspeed aviation topics and grouped numbers in a radio frequency, airspeed, or heading. Pilots and controllers communications became more conversational and verbose when their transmissions included advisory or request speech acts. Omitting and grouping numbers in transmissions may be strategies used to minimize time on frequency. Ironically, these strategies may create the problems that pilots and controllers are trying to prevent.

Descriptors :   *PILOTS, *SPEECH TRANSMISSION, *AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS, *VOICE COMMUNICATIONS, DATA BASES, FREQUENCY, DELIVERY, CONTROL SYSTEMS, AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEMS, TIME, AERONAUTICS, ERROR ANALYSIS, ERRORS, AIRSPEED, COMMUNICATION AND RADIO SYSTEMS, INSTRUCTIONS, MESSAGE PROCESSING, COLLISION AVOIDANCE, RADIOFREQUENCY, TAXONOMY, READING.

Subject Categories : Personnel Management and Labor Relations
      Air Navigation and Guidance
      Voice Communications

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE