Accession Number : ADA320212

Title :   Volume 1. Aircraft Performance. Chapter 10. Hypersonic Aerodynamics.

Corporate Author : AIR FORCE TEST PILOT SCHOOL EDWARDS AFB CA

PDF Url : ADA320212

Report Date : APR 1987

Pagination or Media Count : 33

Abstract : Earlier in supersonic aerodynamics, it was stated that a compressible, nonviscous, thermally perfect fluid was adequate for analysis of problems (outside of boundary layers) up to about Mach = 5.0. In this section we'll deal with problems above M = 5.0, especially as they relate to re-entry vehicles and hypersonic cruise vehicles. As Mach changes from 4.99 to 5.01 nothing dramatic changes. Mach 5 is just a convenient rule of thumb. Hypersonic flow is best defined as the regime where certain physical flow phenomena become important. The actual Mach number where these physical phenomena become significant will vary with vehicle shape, Reynolds number, etc. These phenomena are: (a) Thin, curved shock layers (i.e. the region between the shock and body). (b) Strong viscous effects throughout the shock layer. (c) Low density effects resulting in a non-zero velocity at the surface (velocity slip). (d) High energy causing the fluid to behave in a non-thermally perfect manner.

Descriptors :   *FLIGHT TESTING, *PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), *AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS, *HYPERSONIC FLOW, VELOCITY, REENTRY VEHICLES, AIRCRAFT, COURSES(EDUCATION), MACH NUMBER, AEROTHERMODYNAMICS, REYNOLDS NUMBER, HYPERSONIC VEHICLES.

Subject Categories : Aerodynamics
      Mfg & Industrial Eng & Control of Product Sys
      Fluid Mechanics

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE