Accession Number : ADA321101

Title :   De invloed van grensverleggende activiteiten op situationele coping en fysiologische reactiviteit (The Influence of Stress Resistance Training on Situational Coping and Physiological Reactivity).

Descriptive Note : Interim rept.,

Corporate Author : HUMAN FACTORS RESEARCH INST TNO SOESTERBERG (NETHERLANDS)

Personal Author(s) : Wientjes, C. J. ; Wisman, F. ; Orden, C. Y. van ; Gaillard, A. W.

PDF Url : ADA321101

Report Date : 12 AUG 1996

Pagination or Media Count : 43

Abstract : This report describes a study that was conducted among participants of the stress tolerance training course in rock climbing of the Royal Netherlands Army (RNLA), which aims at enhancing stress tolerance. The goals of the study were to assess: (1) the effects of the training course on situational coping, group functioning, and physiological reactivity, (2) the influence of personality measures on these effects, and (3) the degree to which acute stress responses can be predicted on the basis of the scores on a number of personality questionnaires which are assumed to measure different aspects of stress tolerance. The study included state- and trait-questionnaires, and physiological measurements. The measurements were carried out at the barracks (before and after the training course), as well as ambulatorily, during a stressful exercise, which was part of the rock climbing course (i.e., crossing of a ravine of + 80 meters depth via a rope bridge). Thirty-two cadets of the Royal Military School participated in the study. The course resulted in a modest improvement in the problem-oriented situational coping repertoire, but there were no changes in emotion-oriented coping or in indices of group functioning. After the course, there was a reduction in the reactivity of heart rate and respiration rate to a mental stress or, but it is not entirely clear whether this can be ascribed to the influence of the training course. The results suggest that the course indeed serves to enhance stress tolerance, but that the degree to which the course contributes to the development of cognitive/behavioral coping skills is limited. Moreover, the generalizability of the learning experience to specific military stress-situations appears to be limited, and aspects of group functioning appear to receive too little attention.

Descriptors :   *STRESS(PSYCHOLOGY), *STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY), *REACTIVITIES, *MILITARY TRAINING, *TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), MEASUREMENT, MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), PERFORMANCE TESTS, NETHERLANDS, RESPONSE, MENTAL HEALTH, PHYSICAL FITNESS, COURSES(EDUCATION), QUESTIONNAIRES, PERSONALITY, DUTCH LANGUAGE, FOREIGN LANGUAGES, CLIMBING, PEER GROUPS.

Subject Categories : Psychology
      Anatomy and Physiology
      Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE