Accession Number : ADA321192

Title :   Thermal Comfort Strategies: A Report on Cellulose Insulation.

Descriptive Note : Final rept.,

Corporate Author : CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING RESEARCH LAB (ARMY) CHAMPAIGN IL

Personal Author(s) : Deal, Brian M. ; Nemeth, Robert J. ; Adams, Marilyn ; DeBaillie, Lee P.

PDF Url : ADA321192

Report Date : DEC 1996

Pagination or Media Count : 33

Abstract : The U.S. Army maintains 979 million sq ft of space in 171,647 buildings worldwide. Thermal energy costs approximately $350 million per year, of which an estimated $84 million could be saved with simple building envelope construction techniques. Past design and construction standards depended on infiltration at weak points in the building envelope to bring fresh air inside. Extensive sealing and caulking followed by an introduction of outside air seems, at first, a contradiction. However, the combination of carefully sealing the building envelope and improving the ventilation system improves comfort, saves energy, controls moisture, increases indoor air quality, and, in general, increases user satisfaction. Thermal comfort is an important aspect of occupant comfort and subsequent productivity. With 1,334,352 Army employees and a $20 billion payroll, even a modest 5 percent increase in productivity could mean an annual savings of $1 billion. This report presents thermal comfort strategies relating to the use of cellulose insulation from both human comfort and technical perspectives. The report discusses some general concepts on human comfort, and briefly describes desirable thermal insulation properties and the attainment of these properties using cellulosic materials. Techniques for the selection and installation of cellulose insulation are described. The report also discusses technical issues involved in general thermal comfort strategies, including: (1) infiltration, (2) thickness effects, (3) settling, and (4) blower door testing. Finally, technical standards are referenced for the selection and installation of cellulose-based insulation materials.

Descriptors :   *ARMY FACILITIES, *ENERGY CONSERVATION, *THERMAL INSULATION, COST EFFECTIVENESS, VENTILATION, ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE, ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS, MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT, TEMPERATURE CONTROL, AIR QUALITY, CONVECTION(HEAT TRANSFER), ENERGY CONSUMPTION, AIR PRESSURE, CELLULOSE, MOISTUREPROOFING.

Subject Categories : Plastics
      Air Condition, Heating, Lighting & Ventilating
      Logistics, Military Facilities and Supplies

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE