Accession Number : ADA321267

Title :   Effects of Misinformation on the Concealed Knowledge Test.

Descriptive Note : Final rept. Mar 95-Aug 96,

Corporate Author : NORTH DAKOTA UNIV GRAND FORKS DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY

Personal Author(s) : Amato-Henderson, Susan L.

PDF Url : ADA321267

Report Date : AUG 1996

Pagination or Media Count : 55

Abstract : Misinformation effects occur in laboratory settings despite disagreement over the mechanism(s) responsible for such effects. Both memory impairment and non-impairment hypotheses explain the phenomenon. The effects of misinformation were examined using the Concealed Knowledge Test (CKT), a psychophysiological detection of deception technique. Ninety-six subjects watched a videotaped crime used to induce guilt. One week later, subjects were given misinformation about three crime details, took a CKT inquiring about the three misled details and three non-misled crime details, and took a 20-item memory test concerning the crime. The six questions asked during the CKT were included in the memory test. Subjects who chose the misinformation on a misled detail were labeled as successfully misinformed. Significant differences were found between the misled and non-misled CKT series, with misinformation leading to a lower score (i.e., higher probability of being categorized as truthful). An interaction was found between CKT detail type and information manipulation with univariate procedures identifying skin resistance amplitude, skin resistance half-recovery time, and abdominal respiration as significant dependent measures. These findings support the memory impairment hypotheses.

Descriptors :   *MEMORY(PSYCHOLOGY), *PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, *CRIMINOLOGY, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), STRESS(PSYCHOLOGY), STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY), RETENTION(PSYCHOLOGY), PERCEPTION(PSYCHOLOGY), REACTION(PSYCHOLOGY), CRIMES, CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS, TEST CONSTRUCTION(PSYCHOLOGY), LIE DETECTORS, GALVANIC SKIN RESPONSE.

Subject Categories : Psychology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE