Accession Number : ADA322704

Title :   An Ecological Framework for Monitoring Sustainable Management of Wildlife: A New Mexico Furbearer Example.

Descriptive Note : Information and technology rept.,

Corporate Author : DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WASHINGTON DC

Personal Author(s) : Thompson, Bruce C. ; Miller, Damien F. ; Doumitt, Theresa A. ; Jacobson, Thereas R. ; Munson-McGee, Melody L.

PDF Url : ADA322704

Report Date : SEP 1996

Pagination or Media Count : 46

Abstract : Understanding use relative to availability is necessary to manage wildlife harvest sustainably. We used ecological zones (ecozones) as a framework for evaluating sustainable extraction and for making management decisions concerning 23 furbearing mammal species in New Mexico. We selected an ecological classification scheme, reviewed technical literature mapped species distribution among ecozones, assessed harvest, estimated sustainable extraction thresholds (levels that trigger management review) where possible, and organized all information in a format with potential application to managing other wildlife. Technical literature review of 70 key words and species names identified 534 citations regarding furbearers in ecozones shared by New Mexico and adjacent states; 260 publications contained pertinent information. We used geographic information system (GIS) software to map estimated occupied habitat by ecozone. Species richness patterns indicated foci for future multiple-species research. This GIS mapping could support interjurisdictional application. We found demographic information necessary to estimate sustainable extraction thresholds only for bobcat (Lynx rufus) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes). However, conflicting demographic data indicated these estimates could be misleading. We attempted to contact 755 furbearer licensees during the 1991-92 fur season of whom 6.4% were surveyed by journal, 62.5% by mail, 15.6% by telephone, and 15.5% by personal interview. Generally, reported furbearer harvest was consistent with species-ecozone combinations expected from maps of estimated occupied habitat. Our literature synthesis, distribution maps, demographic review, and survey evaluation prepared a substantial ecological baseline for future resource planning.

Descriptors :   *NATURAL RESOURCES, *RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, *ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, *WILDLIFE, *ECOLOGY, TEST AND EVALUATION, COMPUTER PROGRAMS, DATA BASES, DECISION MAKING, INFORMATION SYSTEMS, BIOLOGY, MAMMALS, LITERATURE SURVEYS, DISTRIBUTION, SYNTHESIS, DEMOGRAPHY, AVAILABILITY, SHARING, BASE LINES, SURVEYS, DOCUMENTS, CLASSIFICATION, MAPS, NEW MEXICO, FISHERIES, GEOGRAPHY, TRIGGER CIRCUITS.

Subject Categories : Biology
      Ecology
      Environmental Health and Safety

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE