Accession Number : ADA323196

Title :   A Comparison of Two Navy Watch Schedules.

Descriptive Note : Final rept.,

Corporate Author : NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA

Personal Author(s) : Kelly, Tamsin L. ; Ryman, David ; Pattison, Stewart

PDF Url : ADA323196

Report Date : DEC 1996

Pagination or Media Count : 30

Abstract : Many types of shift-work schedules have been devised to achieve the around-the-clock coverage that frequently is required in both military and civilian work environments. Ideal shift lengths and types of rotation remain controversial. Worker job satisfaction has been reported to relate to how many sequential days off their work schedule allows. A natural experiment occurred when the watch schedule in a Navy installation was altered from 2 shifts per day, 7 days a week being covered by 4 individuals per watch location, to 3 shifts per day on weekdays and 2 on weekends, divided among 5 watchstanders. The first schedule provided 3-day weekends on alternate weeks. The second schedule provided a 2-week period with only 2 days of work, every 5 weeks. Data from seven subjects were available for the first schedule and data from 8 subjects (different subjects) from the second schedule. Questionnaire and sleep/work log data collected before and after the schedule change showed that the increase in the number of watchstanders and/or the new schedule resulted in fewer subjects feeling that fatigue sometimes impaired their ability to do their job or made them unsafe when driving home after work. However, amounts of sleep and other measures of fatigue remained basically unchanged, and satisfaction with the schedule was only slightly improved. Thus, increasing the amount of time watchstanders have off work, may not lead to increased sleep. Individuals may choose to devote the extra hours to outside work or recreational activities.

Descriptors :   *SLEEP DEPRIVATION, *FATIGUE(PHYSIOLOGY), *WATCH(DUTY), CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS, NAVAL PERSONNEL, MANPOWER UTILIZATION, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), SCHEDULING, PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS, ATTENTION, JOB SATISFACTION, WORK ELEMENTS, SLEEP, ENDURANCE(PHYSIOLOGY), ADAPTATION(PHYSIOLOGY), RELAXATION(PHYSIOLOGY).

Subject Categories : Stress Physiology
      Personnel Management and Labor Relations

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE