Accession Number : ADA323854

Title :   Soviet and Chinese Perceptions of North Korea, January-June 1983,

Corporate Author : LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC FEDERAL RESEARCH DIV

Personal Author(s) : Katz, Rodney ; Roth, Mark

PDF Url : ADA323854

Report Date : JUN 1983

Pagination or Media Count : 38

Abstract : The Democratic People's Republic of Korea is the object of varying degrees of attention by Soviet and Chinese observers. While there are some areas of similarity in Soviet and Chinese treatment of the North Koreans in official statements and media reports, the views of Moscow and Beijing generally have not coincided in recent times. The Soviet Union views North Korea as an ostensibly friendly country which does not respond to Soviet aid and friendship with the level of cooperation and recognition expected by Moscow. North Korean leader Kim Il-song is not held in high regard by Moscow's leadership and is mentioned infrequently in the Soviet media. China, on the other hand, can ill afford not to support Pyongyang and thus tends to provide a more positive view of North Korea in official statements and the media. Kim Il-song is thus shown greater deference in the Chinese media. While the Soviet Union provides technical assistance to North Korea it does so at an exceedingly slow pace, taking as long as 13 years to complete construction of some North Korean industrial plants. Chinese aid is provided more promptly, but Beijing says little publicly about its relations with Pyongyang in the areas of trade and economic, technical, or military assistance. Recent pronouncements generally have been limited to the political realm. Neither the Chinese nor the Soviet media discuss the conditions under which either nation would aid Korea in the event of another war on the Korean peninsula. Beijing is particularly apprehensive about the possibility of Soviet involvement in North Korea, but cannot afford to provide much military aid of its own. Both China and the Soviet Union comment about the correctness of DPRK statements opposing US military forces in South Korea, however military contacts with North Korea are rarely mentioned by either.

Descriptors :   *INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, NORTH KOREA, USSR, MILITARY ASSISTANCE, LEADERSHIP, ECONOMICS, GOVERNMENT(FOREIGN), MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER, POLITICAL ALLIANCES, GEOPOLITICS, MEDIA, INTERNATIONAL TRADE, INDUSTRIAL PLANTS, PERCEPTION, COOPERATION, SOUTH KOREA, CHINA, FOREIGN AID, STRATEGIC AREAS.

Subject Categories : Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE