Accession Number : ADA324481

Title :   A Study of Combat Stress, Korea 1952. Preliminary Report.

Corporate Author : JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV CHEVY CHASE MD OPERATIONS RESEARCH OFFICE

Personal Author(s) : Davis, Stanley W. ; Elmadjian, Fred ; Hanson, Lincoln F. ; Liddell, Howard S. ; Zilinsky, Algird A.

PDF Url : ADA324481

Report Date : 05 DEC 1952

Pagination or Media Count : 216

Abstract : What are the physiological and psychological changes that occur in combat infantrymen as a result of combat stress? This question is important in evaluating and predicting combat effectiveness and in determining measures for relieving combat fatigue and stress. This report presents a preliminary examination of data gathered by a field team composed of physiologists, psychologists, and one psychiatrist. Physiological and psychological tests were conducted on a group of 23 soldiers at Camp Omiya, Japan; on 24 infantrymen in Korea who were in reserve behind the MLR; on 39 men from an infantry company which led a major assault; and on 13 men from another company that had just returned from five days active combat. Preliminary findings, pending final treatment of the data, show these general conclusions: Analysis of blood and urine specimens show definite physiological changes occurring as a result of combat. Physiological disturbances resulting from the effects of psychological stress were found to be dehydration and an almost total absence of certain types of adult white blood cells. The adrenal gland, particularly the adrenal cortex, functions normally in the front-line infantryman not in active combat, but shows a high level of adrenal activity following severe combat stress.

Descriptors :   *MILITARY PERSONNEL, *STRESS(PSYCHOLOGY), *STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY), *INFANTRY PERSONNEL, *PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, *PSYCHIATRY, *NEUROSES, STRESSES, WARFARE, COMBAT EFFECTIVENESS, TEAMS(PERSONNEL), JAPAN, COMPANY LEVEL ORGANIZATIONS, KOREA, PSYCHOLOGY, ADULTS, BLOOD, URINE, LEUKOCYTES, DEHYDRATION, GLANDS, PSYCHOLOGISTS, ADRENAL GLANDS, ADRENAL CORTEX, PHYSIOLOGISTS, STRESS RELIEVING.

Subject Categories : Psychology
      Personnel Management and Labor Relations
      Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE