Accession Number : ADA324884

Title :   In Vitro Microtubule Growth for Producing Engineered Nanotransport Machines.

Descriptive Note : Final rept. 1 Jun 96-31 Mar 97,

Corporate Author : COLORADO UNIV AT BOULDER DEPT OF PHYSICS

Personal Author(s) : McIntosh, J. R. ; Rogers, C. T.

PDF Url : ADA324884

Report Date : 25 MAR 1997

Pagination or Media Count : 4

Abstract : Methods have been developed for depositing patterned distributions of any antibody molecule on a Si0(2) wafer with high spatial definition and signal-to-noise ratio (Mooney et al., PNAS, 1996). This method is now being used to attach microtubule organizing centers (centrosomes) in patterned arrays to develop organized microtubule geometries of known polarity. In a parallel investigation, antibodies bound to glass have been used to attach chromosomes isolated from mammalian cells to a substrate for light microscopy. Stable microtubule fragments have then been bound to the chromosomes, elongated with rhodamine labeled tubulin, and their dynamics studied both by direct inspection and during intervention by a laser trap, holding a bead affixed to the chromosome distal end of the labile microtubule. Both chromosomes and centrosomes are exarnples of microtubule organizing centers with mechanical properties that can contribute to future work on engineered nanomachines.

Descriptors :   *IN VITRO ANALYSIS, *MICROSCOPY, *CELLS(BIOLOGY), *PHOTOLITHOGRAPHY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, STABILITY, MICROSTRUCTURE, MAMMALS, DYNAMICS, MOLECULES, SIGNAL TO NOISE RATIO, LIGHT, SUBSTRATES, GLASS, LASERS, CHROMOSOMES, INSPECTION, TUBULAR STRUCTURES, ANTIBODIES, FRAGMENTS, GROWTH(PHYSIOLOGY).

Subject Categories : Anatomy and Physiology
      Photography

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE