Accession Number : ADA326509

Title :   Crisis Response Policy: Should It Be Changed?

Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s) : Lauderdale, Larry C.

PDF Url : ADA326509

Report Date : APR 1997

Pagination or Media Count : 36

Abstract : Protecting the United States national security is the number one priority of senior U.S. civilian and military leaders. The U.S. National Security Strategy (NSS) of Engagement and Enlargement policy, which is supported by the National Military Strategy (NMS) policy, was developed to provide this protection. Crisis response is one aspect of U.S. policy stipulated in the NSS and NMS. As a crucial part of U.S. policy, it supports all elements of power to deter threats, and when necessary, to fight and win wars. The U.S. military force structure, however, must be sufficiently sized to counter threats and respond to crises around the world. There is a growing concern within the Department of Defense (DoD) that current U.S. crisis response policy set forth in the NSS and NMS is not sufficient and needs to be changed. Some critics believe it does not clarify how U.S. military forces can and will respond to two almost simultaneous wars given the lift capability shortfall. U.S. senior leadership are thus challenged to develop a more viable crisis response policy that will support two almost simultaneous major regional conflicts (MRCs) with a smaller but balanced military force structure.

Descriptors :   *NATIONAL SECURITY, *CRISIS MANAGEMENT, *MILITARY CAPABILITIES, MILITARY FORCES(UNITED STATES), DEPLOYMENT, MILITARY REQUIREMENTS, MILITARY STRATEGY, POLICIES, MILITARY DOCTRINE, MANPOWER UTILIZATION, THREAT EVALUATION, CONFLICT, MILITARY PLANNING, LOGISTICS PLANNING.

Subject Categories : Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE