Accession Number : ADA326864

Title :   The Newest Age Now Begins: The Future of the U.S.-Japan Security Alliance.

Descriptive Note : Research rept.,

Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s) : Bacon, Catherine T.

PDF Url : ADA326864

Report Date : 1997

Pagination or Media Count : 31

Abstract : The U.S.-Japan Security Alliance has linked both nations since the 1950s. During the Cold War, security issues were paramount. Japan recovered, and America contained Soviet Communism. Japan provided basing rights, and America provided the military muscle for security in Northeast Asia. However, the end of the Cold War and economic changes in Japan and America are straining the alliance. Some argue that the Alliance is no longer necessary, but it is still vital to bilateral security and economic interests. This research project will discuss the alliance by examining two tensions; trade tensions, and social tensions. Large trade imbalances have caused the first tension, and the second tension was sparked by the rape of a young Okinawan girl by U.S. servicemen in September 1996. In April 1997, President Clinton and Prime Minister Hashimoto reaffirmed the importance of the treaty, but also announced that Futema Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) would close. To make clear the relevance of the alliance, this paper will analyze various aspects of both countries, including economic activities and security needs. Since a base has been closed, it is likely that more protests will follow. U.S. and Japanese planners should consider options for maintaining the Security Alliance.

Descriptors :   *INTERNATIONAL POLITICS, *JAPAN, *INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, FOREIGN POLICY, MILITARY STRATEGY, NATIONAL SECURITY, MILITARY ASSISTANCE, ECONOMIC IMPACT, GOVERNMENT(FOREIGN), INTERNATIONAL TRADE, TREATIES, POLITICAL NEGOTIATIONS.

Subject Categories : Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE